The Proper of the Mass Organ Accompaniment, Complete!

Fr. Weber has completed an amazing task! Posted here are all of the organ accompaniments for The Proper of the Mass. The composition is a monumental work. Many thanks to Fr. Weber for his amazing work on the project and his fidelity to preserving and promoting chant in our Church!Image-1

The Proper of the Mass Organ Accompaniment, Complete File (60 mg)

The Propers, organ accompaniment, divided by Season:

The Proper of the Mass Organ Accompaniment: Index

The Proper of the Mass Organ Accompaniment: Advent

2. The Proper of the Mass Organ Accompaniment: Christmas

3. The Proper of the Mass Organ Accompaniment: Jan 1st – Through Baptism of the Lord

4. The Proper of the Mass Organ Accompaniment: Ash Wednesday through 3rd Sunday of Lent

5. The Proper of the Mass Organ Accompaniment: Lent, Sunday 4 through Palm Sunday

6. The Proper of the Mass Organ Accompaniment: Triduum

7. The Proper of the Mass Organ Accompaniment: Easter Sunday through 4th Sunday 

8. The Proper of the Mass Organ Accompaniment: Easter, Sundays 5 and 6

9. The Proper of the Mass Organ Accompaniment: Easter, 7th Sunday through Pentecost

10. The Proper of the Mass Organ Accompaniment: Ordinary Time, Sundays 1-5

11. The Proper of the Mass Organ Accompaniment: Ordinary Time, Sundays 6-10

12. The Proper of the Mass Organ Accompaniment: Ordinary Time, Sundays 11-15

13. The Proper of the Mass Organ Accompaniment: Ordinary Time, Sundays 16-20

14. The Proper of the Mass Organ Accompaniment: Ordinary Time, Sundays 21-25

15. The Proper of the Mass Organ Accompaniment: Ordinary Time, Sundays 26-30

16. The Proper of the Mass Organ Accompaniment: Ordinary Time, Sundays 31-40

17. The Proper of the Mass Organ Accompaniment: Holy Trinity and Christ the King

18. The Proper of the Mass Organ Accompaniment: Sanctoral Feb. 1st – June 29th

19. The Proper of the Mass Organ Accompaniment: Sanctoral Aug 6th – Nov. 1st

20. The Proper of the Mass Organ Accompaniment: Sanctoral Nov 2nd – Dec. 8th

21. The Proper of the Mass Organ Accompaniment: Ordination, Marriage, Water

22. The Proper of the Mass Organ Accompaniment: Tones for Glory Be, Polyphony

23. The Proper of the Mass Organ Accompaniment: Gloria, Sequences, Passion of St. John

24. The Proper of the Mass Organ Accompaniment: Organ Music on Chant Themes

25. The Proper of the Mass Organ Accompaniment: Information, Taking up the Psalter, Singing the Propers, The Message of the Mass Melodies

26. Organ Propers for February 1st – June 29th

12 thoughts on “The Proper of the Mass Organ Accompaniment, Complete!

  1. Thank you for providing the link to this work. Truly, it is a great work for God’s glory and the beautification of His bride, the Church. God reward you, and God reward Fr. Weber. You’re in my prayers.

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  2. I have just downloaded the “complete” file. Very interesting; however, most of the 1900s are missing. I think that it is probably this entire section:

    19. The Proper of the Mass Organ Accompaniment: Sanctoral Aug 6th – Nov. 1st

    Thank you for everything that you do.

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  3. What an excellent resource! Thank you so very much for making this available and to Fr. Weber for this extraordinary labor. I had a technical question: the Offertory Antiphons for the Sundays and Solemnities are clearly taken from the Gradual. Why not do the same for the Entrance and Communion Antiphons and keep the sources consistent? Or does such a volume exist already? My understanding of the Missal Antiphons is that they are meant to be used at spoken Masses whereas the Gradual chants are for sung Masses. Thanks for the info! GOD bless you.

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    • Thanks for the comment! I’ll pass it on to Fr. Weber. My understanding is that Entrance and Communion antiphons are part of the official Roman Missal and thus have to be used in exact translation – except for a shorter version of the same antiphon. The United States bishops have a clause in the General Instruction to use any other approved hymn or song, but I’ve never seen a list of any approved hymns or songs. I’ve never researched the offertory antiphons. There is a source for these, but we never covered it in class. They’re so seldom used that they do not receive much attention.

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    • I see what you’re saying now. The offertory antiphons come straight from the official Latin Gradual which almost no one uses jin America. I am not aware of one gradualy in English that would fit that purpose. The problem lies in the offertory antiphons not having official translations since they’re not part of the Roman Missal, but only the gradual. The other practical problem is that ICEL has changed its collective mind multiple times on how to translate the Entrance and Communion antiphons. We think at this point we have their final options since the publication of the new translation, so let’s hope that is correct. There’s just not much energy in the US church for the offertory antiphons given the work being done in the breviary and Responsorial Pslams.

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  4. Since I have started looking for good Books of accompagning gregorian chants I’ve never found Books that are easy to learn a part from what I just discoverd here and I really feel like being determined to go head with this site.

    Thanks a lot

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    • Glad to hear you found chants you can learn! That’s part of the philosophy of Fr. Weber’s pedagogy. Barely any Churches before the Council used the full through-composed chants every week. There were many publications that used simpler tones with the same text. Once people understand the simpler tones, the more complex ones make much more sense and are easier to teach. Sounds like good normal music-education (that was my first degree 🙂

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